May 2021 Travel Courses

We will begin accepting applications for May 2021 Travel courses in July. Check back here for the form then. All applications submitted by October 1 receive equal consideration.

Apply for a Travel Course 

INQ/FREN 277 Paris, City of Cinema
Instructor: Dr. Liz Groff
Prerequisite: FREN 201 and Permission
Fee: tba, likely $5,000-$5,500
Includes airfare, tba
On location in France                                                                                                                                

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

Paris---1895: The world’s first-ever film screening; 1936: One of the largest film archives opens; 1963: Charade; 2018: Mission Impossible – Fallout. With over 5,000 hours of images filmed around Paris and over 88 cinemas in the city, if anything Paris is a “City of Cinema.” How did cinema shape and continues to shape Paris: its culture, its people, and its imaginary? How did Paris shape and continues to shape the film industry: its culture, its people, its imaginary? How do filmic representations of Paris align, or not, with reality? In this May-term course, we will study the relationship between the city and cinema. We will examine films and the actual locations in Paris where they were shot. We will investigate various types of theaters in different areas of Paris, visit archives, conduct archival and experiential research, as well as engage in experiential learning by hands-on filmmaking.


INQ 177 Irish and British Theater
Instructor: Dr. Nelson Barre
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $5,000-$5,500
Includes airfare, tba
On location in Ireland and England                                                                                                     

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

How are cultural values of Ireland and England reflected in their art, specifically through theatre? This on-site course seeks to answer this question through travels between Ireland and England, focusing primarily on the experiences of theatre and art. All levels are welcome: for some it could be an introduction while others will deepen their understanding of theatre and its artistic forms. You will be expected to attend shows and explore the places where we are traveling. We will respond to plays on the page, through some analysis and discussion. Then we will attend performances, after there will be discussion of various aspects (from acting and design to content and the audience experience). The goal of the course is to cultivate your ability to write and speak critically about this art form and the many aspects that go into its production.


INQ 277 The Writer's Place
Instructor: Dr. Mary Hill
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $5000-$5500
Includes airfare, tba
On location in England                                                                                                                          

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

By exploring the rooms where writers created their masterpieces—as well as the buildings, cities, and landscapes that inspired their works—we will be following a long tradition of the literary pilgrimage. What is the connective tissue between a literary text and its place of genesis? How are our imaginations and understandings impacted by following in the footsteps of a beloved writer? This course allows students to experience and reflect upon real world engagements with imaginary worlds.


INQ/PHST 277 Accessibility & Public Health in the Netherlands
Instructor: Dr. Kit Myers
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $5,000-$5,500
Includes airfare, tba
On location in the Netherlands                                                                                                                 

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, Fortnightly, and Fowler Legacy Scholarships

What does it mean for a building, institution, or city to be Universally Designed? What would it look like to truly include and empower people with differences of ability? In 1966 Het Dorp ("The Village") welcomed its first residents, revolutionizing rehabilitation and care as the first residential community in the Netherlands for people with physical disabilities. In recent years, Het Dorp has entered a renewal phase and opened Academy Het Dorp to better foster independence through innovative use of technology. During our time in the Netherlands we will travel to Het Dorp, where we will engage with foundational disability studies scholar Irving Zola's ethnography of Het Dorp, Missing Pieces: A Chronicle of Living with a Disability, in which the author critically engages with his own disabilities. We will reflect on our own “differ-abilities” while we learn about innovative solutions for creating a more accessible and inclusive society.


INQ 277 African Faces and Voices

Instructor: Dr. Joshua Rubongoya
Prerequisites: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $4,000-$4,500 includes airfare, lodging, in-country transportation, most meals, excursion to national park.
On location in Uganda, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, Fortnightly, and Fowler Legacy Scholarships

Students will learn about the impact of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) on the political process and in particular how they relate to government institutions. They will interview leaders and members of NGOs, Members and the Speaker of Parliament and participate in workshops run by Professors from Makerere University. The course will grapple with one overarching question: Do NGOs, as key sections of civil society  empower citizens or have they become agencies of the state and what does this mean for democratic consolidation in Uganda? Our interface with environmental NGOs will include an excursion to a national park.
This course counts in the IR major "Non-Western Perspectives" section and as a general elective in both the IR and Poli Sci major.  


INQ 177 Greek Landscape and Literature: The Oresteia in Context

Instructor:  Dr. Wendy Larson-Harris
Prerequisites:  Permission
Fee:  tba, likely $5,000-$5,500, includes airfare from a major US airport, in country transportation, accommodations, entrance fees, and two meals per day.
On location in Greece, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs and Fortnightly Scholarships

The Oresteia trilogy, first performed in 458 BCE, tells the story of Orestes, son of the royal family of Argos: a tragic tale of betrayal, murder, and revenge spread over three distinct regions of Greece.  The Oresteia also offers an account of Athens' emergence from the archaic past into the Golden Age of democracy and leadership among other Greek city-states, crowned by the Parthenon on the Acropolis.  Following in the footsteps of Orestes, we will explore an island, mountains, ancient archeological sites, and the modern city of Athens in order to experience the role of landscape in Greek culture.   


INQ 177 Desperately Seeking Dragons

Instructors: Dr. Lisa Stoneman with Dr. DB Poli
Prerequisites: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $4,500-$5,000 includes airfare, lodging, breakfasts, charter transportation, and entrance fees.
On location in Wales & England, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

How can we use the scientific lens to observe and examine folklore origins? How does observation of the world around us help us hypothesize about the mysteries of the natural world? Geneticists have been able to explain a number of phenomena (cyclops, mermaidism, werewolf syndrome) through genetic mutation, but it is the collection of stories and analysis of cultural norms that provide the conclusions upon which lore is created. This course is designed to examine dragon folklore representations through a scientific lens. Approaching folklore establishment from a multidisciplinary viewpoint provides a more complete picture of lore development and propagation. Travel will include locations rich in dragon lore and coordinating geologic phenomena as well as museums, churches, castles, and fossil sites.


INQ/HIST 277 Emergence of Germany

Instructors: Dr. Rob Willingham
Prerequisites: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $4,500-$5,000, including airfare, some meals, lodging, in-country transportation, and entrance fees
On location in Germany; dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, Fortnightly, and Fowler Legacy Scholarships

This course examines the development of German national identity through studies of four critical turning points: the Lutheran Reformation, World War I's revolutionary end, the terror of the National Socialist regime, and the collapse of the German Democratic Republic and the Berlin Wall


INQ/HIST 277 Japan in the Long Twentieth Century
Instructor: Dr. Stella Xu
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $4,500-$5,000
Includes airfare, lodging, some meals, entrance fees, and in-country transportation
On location in Japan, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, Fortnightly, and Fowler Legacy Scholarships

How did the Japanese people live through the turbulent course of events in the twentieth century? How have people remembered and commemorated this century? This course helps students take a close look at Japanese history and culture through the direct experience of visiting museums, historical sites, and conducting conversation with local people to learn about their experience and memory of the past century. We will visit three major cities, Tokyo, Kyoto, and Hiroshima. Important sites to be visited include the Tokyo National Museum; Yūshūkan, a modern history museum inside the Yasukuni Shrine; Showakan (National Showa Memorial Museum, a museum of Japanese history from 1926-1989); the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, and the Fukuromachi Elementary School Peace Museum. Through these visits, students will explore multiple layers of Japanese history, culture, and the daily life of Japanese people. We will also visit Kansai Kaidai, the Japanese university with which Roanoke College has a direct exchange program.


INQ/ENST 277 Sustainability & Spirituality in the Pacific Northwest
Instructor: Dr. Laura Hartman
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba, likely $2,500-$3,000
Includes airfare, onsite transportation, lodging, most meals, and entrance fees
On location in the Cascade Mountains of Washington, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Fortnightly Scholarship

Holden Village is a very special place. Formerly a mining camp in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state, Holden was bought by Lutherans who transformed it into a phenomenon that is hard to describe. Part eco-village, part religious community; part village, part retreat center; remote, yet grounding; creative, yet rooted in tradition. In our time at Holden, we will participate in its daily rhythms and study its environmental sustainability. In so doing, we will learn to answer questions about renewal, restoration, reformation, and ritual. The place itself is our primary text and students will learn to articulate what they learn through creative projects.


INQ/HIST 277 Pausanias' Grand Tour of Greece
Instructor: Dr. Jason Hawke
Prerequisite: Permission
Fee: tba; likely $5,000-$5,500
Includes airfare, lodging, all dinners, and in-country transportation
On location in Greece, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

Pausanias, a 2nd-century AD Greek living under Roman rule, visited sites of past glory and wrote an informative travelogue and cultural history of ancient Greece.  Students will travel in his footsteps, a journey that will take them to Athens, Sparta, Corinth, and Delphi, among other sites.  Students will experience firsthand the monuments of ancient Greece and the modern presentation of them and confront the landscapes that Pausanias describes.  In reflecting upon their own reactions and Pausanias’ account of the ancient Greek past and its remains, students will interpret their responses to Greece ancient and modern.  By immersing ourselves in Pausanias’ account, relevant modern scholarship, and visiting the landscapes Pausanias once beheld, we will be able to consider the interplay among the physical and imagined pasts, and think about the ways we construct identities through the conversations we choose to have with those pasts and how we conduct them.
Course Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/Greece-May-Term-2020-2047034005565100/


INQ/SPAN 377 Contemporary Spain-Global:  Lengua y cultura
Instructors: Dr. Charlene Kalinoski and Dr. Alba Arias Alvarez
Prerequisite: SPAN 202 and permission
Fee: tba; likely $4,000-$4,500
Includes airfare, homestays with two meals daily, hotels, classes, entrance fees, and in-country transportation
On location in Spain, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

Encounter the language and culture of Spain through this three-week immersion experience.  From our base in Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, we will explore this city and venture beyond it to Madrid and Andalucía to learn about linguistic and cultural variations within Spain.  This course is designed to promote the development of spoken Spanish through immersion and to increase cultural awareness and multi-cultural literacy. This course will count as an elective in the Spanish major and minor programs.  It satisfies the study abroad requirement for the Spanish major.


INQ 277 Vampires, Witches and Werewolves in Slavic Culture-Global
Instructor: Dr. Martha Kuchar
Prerequisites: Permission
Fee: tba; likely $4,000-$4,500
Includes airfare, lodging with breakfasts, some group meals, entrance fees, and in-country transportation
On location in Poland and far western Ukraine, dates tba  

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobb and Fortnightly Scholarships

Who are the "undead" in the context of Slavic culture, and why has this region been so rich in their expression, from Dracula to Baba Yaga to Vovkulaka? Why have witches, vampires, and other mythological creatures so captivated the minds of pre-Christian and Christian Slaves that a rich and persistent iconography has risen around them? This course examines the mythology and beliefs about the vampire, witch, and werewolf because they are central to Slavic beliefs about death and the afterlife, concepts which form the broad canvas of the course. The vampiric "undead," the shamanic witch, and the metamorphic werewolf stand at the boundary between two worlds, the living and the dead. Other mythological creatures will be included in the study: dragons, firebirds, and the like. We will read about them in histories, legends, myths, and folk tales. The course will challenge students to separate historical fact from popular fiction, and to consider the complex role of these iconic figures in Slavic and East European cultures. This course is an excellent follow-up to INQ 270: Slavic Folklore, but completion of that course is not required.


INQ/ARTH 277 The Grand Tour of Italy
Instructor: Dr. Julia Sienkewicz
Prerequisite:  Permission
Fee: tba, likely $5,000-$5,500
Includes airfare, lodging with breakfasts, some group meals, entrance fees, and in-country transportation 
On location in Italy, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, artists, scholars, and socialites alike embarked in a practice called the “Grand Tour,” as a crucial, and often the final, stage in their educations.  Travelling through Continental Europe (and for American artists, also the voyage to the United Kingdom) allowed individuals to see significant sites and works of art, as well as to participate in vibrant communities of like-minded individuals.  This course will consider the cultural, historical, and artistic phenomenon that was the “Grand Tour.” This intensive learning course is designed to immerse students in the experience of the grand tour, both by visiting sites central to the historical grand tour and also by inviting students to enter into the role of grand tourists.


INQ 177 Scotland: Artistic Legacies & Cultural Identities
Instructor: Dr. Dana-Linn Whiteside
Prerequisite: Permission 
Fee:  tba, likely $4,500 - $5,000
Includes airfare, lodging with breakfasts, entrance fees, and in-country transportation
On location in Scotland, dates tba

Eligible for scholarship support: Measure of a Maroon, Cobbs, and Fortnightly Scholarships

This course is a multidisciplinary study of Scottish art and identity as manifested in art, literature, and landscape.  Students will gain a broad understanding of Scotland as a case study of European cultural history. Ideally, students will take away from this course not only a deep understanding of an important European civilization, but a more refined awareness of the characteristics, manifestations and role of material and social culture as factors that reflect and shape social identity in any nation or among any unified group of peoples.